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Din presa britanica
January 6, 2015
11:37 am
shrinkescu
Guest

Si tot din GP land...de la Doctors.net citire...
New-style GPs for new cities? 06/01/2015
Radical forms of general practice could be introduced in new garden cities, based on video links and new technology, a senior NHS manager has said.

Traditional general practice might be an “alien concept” to the young families who populate these proposed new garden cities, according to NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens.

He said the design of these cities should start from the “default assumption” that people would use digital means first of all to interact with the health service.

“The idea of booking appointments and physically turning up to GP surgeries for routine things is an alien concept” for people in their 20s and 30s, he told the Financial Times.

Patients would sign up to a “virtual primary care services” and would call their doctor or nurse on the iPhone, he said.

Mr Stevens said proposed new towns in Ebbsfleet in Kent or in Swindon or Tower Hamlets would become “health service new towns.”

He added: “You’re not going to have, in the future, a separate police station, ambulance station, schools, health service buildings and so on.”

January 3, 2015
8:50 am
shrinkescu
Guest

Tot pt cei din GP land...a very controversial article!
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new.....aders.html

December 30, 2014
8:42 am
shrinkescu
Guest

GP assistant recruitment may be stepped up 29/12/2014 (Doctors.net.uk)
The NHS is set to recruit hundreds of physician assistants in a bid to relieve pressure on GPs, it has been reported.

Assistants would be based in GP surgeries and help undertake consultations – under supervision from doctors.

Planners are now considering recruiting another 200 associates, it was reported. About 200 already work in the NHS.

According to the Daily Mail, the target is being set by Health Education England.

Its chief executive Professor Ian Cumming said: “With the appropriate training and supervision, they are a fantastic asset. They are incredibly popular and the junior doctors find them fantastic members of the team to help share appropriate workload.

“But these people aren’t doctors. They have a different skill but used in the right way they are an invaluable part to providing the best possible care.”

But the deputy chair of the British Medical Association’s GP committee, Dr Richard Vautrey, said: “Patients want and need more GPs and the priority must be to do all we can to recruit new GPs and retain those currently employed in the workforce.

“However, the current situation is so critical that any extra support for general practice is to be encouraged. But the implications and practicalities will need to be carefully considered.”

October 22, 2014
1:54 pm
shrinkescu
Guest
October 22, 2014
1:51 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

News din GP land...
General practice 'in crisis' 22/10/2014
Poor policy planning is responsible for much of the growing pressure on the UK's GPs, a group of doctors says today.

This year, two workforce reviews have concluded there are too few GPs and existing GPs are stressed, burning out, and feeling increasingly unable to deliver healthcare safely.

Writing in The BMJ, Professor Veronica Wilkie of Worcester University, UK, warns that the share of NHS funding in primary care is at an all time low - at 8.3% of the NHS budget - and the number of GPs per capita is falling. However, the demands on GP's time are rising, with an ageing population.

"We need a coherent plan for workforce development in primary care, taking into account undergraduate and postgraduate training and beyond, with a robust funding plan that is flexible enough to reflect the local population's needs but big enough to prevent further disintegration and a lack of investment," she writes.

Stephen Gillam, a GP in Luton, UK, adds that politicians must "Heed experts on the front line, avoid populist gimmickry and follow through on promises to increase workforce numbers."

Dr Richard Vautrey of the British Medical Association's GP committee backed the analysis today.

He said: "GPs are facing unprecedented pressure that is threatening to undermine services across the country."

He points out that further pressure is coming from policymakers' decisions to move more care from hospitals into the community without additional funding.

"These problems are forcing GP morale to an all time low which in turn is contributing to a workforce crisis," he states. "We have to move ahead with a long term, sustained programme of investment that gives GP services the funding, workforce and facilities to continue to deliver first rate care to patients."

Wilkie, V. British general practice: another Collings moment? BMJ 22 October 2014 doi: 10.1136/bmj.g6274

October 8, 2014
4:58 pm
Member
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
November 11, 2009
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http://www.theguardian.com/sci.....erner-hell

 

Stefan Hell s-a nascut si a trait in Arad pana la 15 ani – televiziunile din Ro vuiesc astazi despre aceasta "realizare". Ar trebui oare Romania sa fie mandra?! Confused

 

Nobel prize for chemistry awarded to trio for pioneering microscope work

Winners made it possible to see features at the scale of billionths of a metre, smashing a theoretical barrier for optical microscopy
Stefan Hell, 51, at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen, William Moerner, 61, at Stanford University
in California, and Eric Betzig, 54, at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Virginia, laid the foundations for powerful new
microscopes that are used to study tissues at the level of single molecules.
 
“It’s no exaggeration to say that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has revolutionised imaging, so this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry is very well deserved. The resolution in microscopy had been limited to 200 nanometres – about the size of the smallest bacteria – for several hundred years,” said Stefanie Reichelt, head of light microscopy at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute.
“The new imaging developments suddenly gave us a more than tenfold increase in resolution and we can now see individual components of cells in great detail. But these are much more than just pretty images – at this resolution, we can begin to understand much more clearly what is happening in important biological processes.”

“Super-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy is now enabling scientists to peer inside living nerve cells in order to explore brain synapses, study proteins involved in Huntingdon’s disease and track cell division in embryos – revealing whole new levels of understanding as to what is going on in the human body down to the nanoscale.”

October 7, 2014
11:20 am
shrinkescu
Guest

Si cand ma gandesc ca fiica mea a absolvit medicina la UCL...

Nobel award for brain map professor 07/10/2014

A London professor is to share this year's Nobel Prize for medicine with two Norwegians, it has been announced.

The three scientists gained the award for unravelling the mysteries of the brain's ability to map around it - the so-called inner GPS.

Professor John O'Keefe, of University College, London, first identified nerve cells involved in this system in 1971.

Further key discoveries were made in 2005 by his fellow laureates, Professors May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

A spokesman for the Nobel Assembly in Sweden said: "The discoveries of John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser have solved a problem that has occupied philosophers and scientists for centuries – how does the brain create a map of the space surrounding us and how can we navigate our way through a complex environment?

"The discovery of the brain’s positioning system represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of how ensembles of specialised cells work together to execute higher cognitive functions. It has opened new avenues for understanding other cognitive processes, such as memory, thinking and planning."

The president of University College London, Professor Michael Arthur said: "John O'Keefe is one of UCL's outstanding neuroscientists and I am delighted that his work on the very basic question of how the hippocampus in the brain stores spatial information and thus allows us to navigate our way through a complex world, has been recognised by the award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine.

"John continues his ground-breaking work as the first Director of the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour and I am delighted that this new institute at UCL will be guided and led by such a distinguished scientist."

September 24, 2014
1:30 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

De la Doctors.net.uk citire...

 

Miliband promises 8,000 GPs  24/09/2014

A Labour government would increase the number of doctors, nurses and midwives in the NHS by 36,000, opposition leader Ed Miliband said yesterday.

The extra staff would be paid for by a £2.5 billion cash injection for the NHS, he told his party's annual conference.

They would include 8,000 extra GPs, 20,000 extra nurses and 3,000 additional midwives.

He told the conference: "We built the NHS, We saved the NHS... and we will transform the NHS for the future."

The extra money for healthcare would come from a new "mansion tax" on properties worth £2 million - raising £1.2 billion, some £1.1 billion from new tax avoidance measures and a £150 million from a levy on tobacco firms.

Experts said he would also need to find money for social care.

The news was welcomed by many doctor and nursing organisations - although others warned of potential recruitment difficulties.

Dr Maureen Baker, chair of the Royal College of GPs, said: “This announcement is a clear and impressive response to the crisis currently engulfing general practice, and will be warmly welcomed by many GPs and practice nurses across the country.

"Today's announcement, if translated into action, would help to pull general practice back from the brink of disaster and pave the way for a revitalised and refreshed GP service."

Royal College of Nursing chief executive Dr Peter Carter said: "Recent years have seen nurse staffing levels become deeply eroded, and many posts left vacant for long periods. Too often, nursing staff are seen as a target for cost savings, only for the NHS to find itself dangerously short and having to spend more on agency staff and recruitment from overseas."

Cathy Warwick, chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives, said: “This shows that Ed Miliband and his team have listened to our concerns and to the evidence, and understand the value of midwives and the maternity team."

But Dr Chaand Nagpaul, chair of the British Medical Association GP committee, warned: "We must first address the challenge of getting more doctors to choose to become GPs at a time of falling recruitment and increasing numbers retiring early.

"The figures speak for themselves. A fall of 15% in the number of doctors training as GPs last year, and 451 training places unfilled. We need to address the root causes of this if there is to be any prospect of increasing GP numbers."

Chris Ham, of think-tank the King's Fund, said: “A combination of a mansion tax, tobacco levy and tax avoidance initiatives alone will not fill the growing funding gap. Today's announcement is a significant step forward but we will need to see Labour's spending plans in full before we know whether they will be enough to meet the funding gap."

September 5, 2014
3:05 pm
Member
Forum Posts: 3
Member Since:
September 5, 2014
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

In fiecare an in prima miercure din August scriu acelasi articol.....oare nu s-au plictisit.? Si support pt juniors e din ce in ce mai Putin, Munca in zadar in schimb.....cat cuprinde. Si da, se moare mai mult in prima sapt din August.....tocmai pt ca se lasa prea mult pe umerii unor copii care nu mai mult de o saptamana in urma erau studenti. Welcome to England

August 7, 2014
9:31 am
shrinkescu
Guest

Iata ce au publicat in Doctors.net.uk

Juniors reveal pressures as next generation starts work  06/08/2014


A new generation of junior doctors starts work today - amid reports of a crisis of morale amongst hospital medical staff.

A survey today shows that 70% of junior doctors believe they do not have enough time to give patients the care they need.

And 82% have struggled with long hours, according to the Medical Protection Society survey.

It was published as thousands of new medical graduates shoulder the responsibilities of new posts in the Foundation Programme.

The survey found that 50% of juniors had raised concerns about the quality of care in the workplace.

Junior doctors' leaders said the findings were "worrying."

The co-chair of the British Medical Association's junior doctors committee, Dr Andrew Collier, said: "If medicine is to remain an attractive career option, and to protect a generation of young doctors from burnout, we need to get to grips with the recurring problems of excessive workloads, long hours and the chipping away of time for training and development."

He added: "It's vitally important that junior doctors feel supported and encouraged to speak out about concerns over patient care.

"It's really worrying that so many junior doctors feel they don't have enough time to give patients the care they need and that many have had to raise concerns over the quality of care. This shows that rising workloads are becoming a real barrier to patient care.

"It's heartening that, despite the pressure junior doctors face, the key motivating factor for choosing medicine is a desire to help people. This explains why junior doctors regularly go above and beyond for their patients."

August 7, 2014
9:31 am
shrinkescu
Guest

Iata ce au publicat in Doctors.net.uk

Juniors reveal pressures as next generation starts work  06/08/2014


A new generation of junior doctors starts work today - amid reports of a crisis of morale amongst hospital medical staff.

A survey today shows that 70% of junior doctors believe they do not have enough time to give patients the care they need.

And 82% have struggled with long hours, according to the Medical Protection Society survey.

It was published as thousands of new medical graduates shoulder the responsibilities of new posts in the Foundation Programme.

The survey found that 50% of juniors had raised concerns about the quality of care in the workplace.

Junior doctors' leaders said the findings were "worrying."

The co-chair of the British Medical Association's junior doctors committee, Dr Andrew Collier, said: "If medicine is to remain an attractive career option, and to protect a generation of young doctors from burnout, we need to get to grips with the recurring problems of excessive workloads, long hours and the chipping away of time for training and development."

He added: "It's vitally important that junior doctors feel supported and encouraged to speak out about concerns over patient care.

"It's really worrying that so many junior doctors feel they don't have enough time to give patients the care they need and that many have had to raise concerns over the quality of care. This shows that rising workloads are becoming a real barrier to patient care.

"It's heartening that, despite the pressure junior doctors face, the key motivating factor for choosing medicine is a desire to help people. This explains why junior doctors regularly go above and beyond for their patients."

July 19, 2014
1:12 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

Si totusi abia astept sa merg in concediu in tara...dar inteleg ca una e sa fii turist in Romania, alta sa traiesti si sa muncesti acolo, Fanule...

CoolClaudiu

July 1, 2014
10:35 pm
Vaslui/Iasi
Member
Forum Posts: 717
Member Since:
April 14, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Add crappy wages, ignorance or even contempt from patients and carelessness from the government…and call it Romania :))

 

Fanu.

" Dacă soarta nu te face să râzi, înseamnă că nu eşti în stare să te prinzi de poantă."

June 29, 2014
7:51 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

De data asta, din presa americana...

June 11, 2014
8:18 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

De la BMA citire...would you recommend your own child a career in medicine?

May 23, 2014
1:01 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

GPs reject calls to charge patients (Doctors.net.uk 23/05/2014) GPs from across the UK have overwhelmingly rejected calls to introduce a charge for seeing a family doctor. Doctors debated the controversial issue and at the Local Medical Committee (LMC) conference in York yesterday (22 May). Although many raised concerns about funding pressures for GP practices, the conference agreed that patients should not be penalised because of a funding shortfall from government. Dr Chaand Nagpaul, chair of the British Medical Association’s GP committee, said: “Many GPs are frustrated and concerned about the future of general practice, given that many GP practices are struggling from a combination of rising patient demand, falling funding and more work being moved from hospitals into the community. “In this climate, it is understandable that the Local Medical Committee (LMC) Conference wanted to debate the need for extra funding for overstretched GP services. But introducing a charge for services would be a tax on illness, hit the most vulnerable the hardest and threaten to undermine the principle of an NHS free at the point of delivery. “Introducing a financial transaction would undermine the trust between doctor and patient. GPs have today sent a resounding message that charging patients is not the solution to the financial crisis facing the NHS. “The BMA is committed to a health service that is free at the point of need and accessible to all and we should proud to have an NHS GP service where no one has to pay to get the treatment they need.” A recent BMA survey found that 6 out of 10 GPs were considering retiring from general practice. * The conference also rejected the idea of GPs opening their surgeries seven days a week and 12 hours a day. The rejection came as the government funds GP pilot schemes aimed at encouraging GPs to find ways of extending opening. Doctors instead called for GPs to have restrictions on their working hours - in the same way as airline pilots for safety reasons. Dr Richard Williams, from The Wirral, said: "We all know what happens if a pilot gets it wrong. If a doctor or a GP gets it wrong, there is a similar catastrophe but yet over a longer period of time."

April 29, 2014
3:16 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

More regulating of doctors by the GMC...

 

CoolClaudiu

April 24, 2014
11:29 pm
shrinkescu
Guest

Hahahhahahaha!!!!!

 

CoolClaudiuCool

April 24, 2014
8:11 pm
Exeter, Devon, Uk
Member
Forum Posts: 39
Member Since:
June 29, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I've just read this article....now I suddenly feel unable to leave the house....

April 24, 2014
10:43 am
shrinkescu
Guest

Agoraphobia???

 

CoolClaudiu

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